Beyond the Coral Sea

Beyond the Coral Sea

Michael Moran

ISBN
9780006552352
Pub date
11/08/2009
Imprint
Flamingo
Binding
Paperback
Format
B Format 129x198mm
Extent
432 pages
Price
£14.99
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Book Overview


East of Java, west of Tahiti and north of the Cape York peninsula of Australia lie the unknown paradise islands of the Coral, Solomon and Bismarck Seas. They were perhaps the last inhabited place on earth to be explored by Europeans, and even today many remain largely unspoilt, despite the former presence of German, British and even Australian colonial rulers.

Michael Moran, a veteran traveller, begins his journey on the island of Samarai, historic gateway to the old British Protectorate, as the guest of the benign grandson of a cannibal. He explores the former capitals of German New Guinea and headquarters of the disastrous New Guinea Compagnie, its administrators decimated by malaria and murder. He travels along the inaccessible Rai Coast through the Archipelago of Contented Men, following in the footsteps of the great Russian explorer ‘Baron’ Nikolai Miklouho-Maclay.

The historic anthropological work of Bronislaw Malinowski guides him through the seductive labyrinth of the Trobriand ‘Islands of Love’ and the erotic dances of the yam festival. Darkly humorous characters, both historical and contemporary, spring vividly to life as the author steers the reader through the richly fascinating cultures of Melanesia.

‘Beyond the Coral Sea’ is a captivating voyage of unusual brilliance and a memorable evocation of a region which has been little written about during the past century.

About the author


Michael Moran was born and educated in Australia and has led a varied and colourful life. He spent his twenties wandering the islands of Polynesia and Melanesia and lived on Norfolk Island for several years, during which time he set up a radio station. He has recently published a novel, Point Venus, in Australia, and now lives and works in London.

Reviews


  • ‘Everything you wanted to know about cannibalism but were afraid to ask is here.’ Daily Telegraph
  • ‘Filled with tales of wonder, sadness and extraordinary behaviour.’ Sunday Times